Copyright © 2018 Quill Classics
BACH
THE WELL-TEMPERED
CLAVIER
Book Two
Rebecca Pechefsky,
harpsichord

QC 1013-2
DISC 1
1. Prelude No. 1 in C Major  2:29
2. Fugue No. 1 in C Major  2:16
3. Prelude No. 2 in C Minor  2:32
4. Fugue No. 2 in C Minor  2:10
5. Prelude No. 3 in C-sharp Major  2:06
6. Fugue No. 3 in C-sharp Major  2:10
7. Prelude No. 4 in C-sharp Minor  5:01
8. Fugue No. 4 in C-sharp Minor  2:57
9. Prelude No. 5 in D Major  3:52
10. Fugue No. 5 in D Major  3:11
11. Prelude No. 6 in D Minor  1:54
12. Fugue No. 6 in D Minor  2:13
13. Prelude No. 7 in E-flat Major  3:19
14. Fugue No. 7 in E-flat Major  2:04
15. Prelude No. 8 in D-sharp Minor  3:11
16. Fugue No. 8 in D-sharp Minor  3:32
17. Prelude No. 9 in E Major  4:00
18. Fugue No. 9 in E Major  5:51
19. Prelude No. 10 in E Minor  2:52
20. Fugue No. 10 in E Minor  3:24
21. Prelude No. 11 in F Major  4:01
22. Fugue No. 11 in F Major  2:03
23. Prelude No. 12 in F Minor  3:35
24. Fugue No. 12 in F Minor  2:16
25. Prelude No. 13 in F-sharp Major  4:18
26. Fugue No. 13 in F-sharp Major  2:54

DISC 2
1. Prelude No. 14 in F-sharp Minor  2:42
2. Fugue No. 14 in F-sharp Minor  4:22
3. Prelude No. 15 in G Major  2:55
4. Fugue No. 15 in G Major  1:35
5. Prelude No. 16 in G Minor  2:38
6. Fugue No. 16 in G Minor  3:37
7. Prelude No. 17 in A-flat Major  4:26
8. Fugue No. 17 in A-flat Major  2:50
9. Prelude No. 18 in G-sharp Minor  5:08
10. Fugue No. 18 in G-sharp Minor  3:50
11. Prelude No. 19 in A Major  2:15
12. Fugue No. 19 in A Major  1:56
13. Prelude No. 20 in A Minor  4:41
14. Fugue No. 20 in A Minor  2:08
15. Prelude No. 21 in B-flat Major  7:23
16. Fugue No. 21 in B-flat Major  2:35
17. Prelude No. 22 in B-flat Minor  3:11
18. Fugue No. 22 in B-flat Minor  4:44
19. Prelude No. 23 in B Major  2:11
20. Fugue No. 23 in B Major  4:11
21. Prelude No. 24 in B Minor  2:26
22. Fugue No. 24 in B Minor  2:10
“Pechefsky’s playing throughout is a marvel: poised and authoritative, with
scarcely a hint of the tremendous work that goes into a recording like this. She
makes everything sound so easy. Like all the great harpsichordists, she uses a
variety of articulation and subtle rubato to heighten the expressive content;
there is never any sense of the mechanical or perfunctory to her playing, but
rather a living, breathing quality. As I wrote about her recording of Book 1, my
impression is “one of having participated in a strenuous but enriching journey,
with the harpsichordist the ideal trail guide through this remarkable landscape.”
I can think of few versions of Book 2 to compare with Pechefsky’s: Scott Ross,
Kenneth Gilbert, and more recently Christine Schornsheim. Given the
exceedingly lifelike recording quality, this is the version to own, even if you
have a dozen others in your library. Highest recommendation."
—Christopher Brodersen,
Fanfare

"We often speak of players in Bach’s solo keyboard works clarifying the
counterpoint, so that we are made aware of the interplay of voices against
each other. Pechefsky is as adept at that as any, but what holds me in awe of
her playing of these preludes and fugues is how she finds, brings out, and
sustains the long-breathed melodic lines hidden within the busy contrapuntal
activity. This is Bach in song. When I listen to her play the fairly simple chordal
harmonic progressions in the Prelude in C♯ Major, I find myself singing the
melody that lies within it, and I now understand what impelled Glenn Gould to
accompany his playing with his own vocalizations."
"I’ve heard lots of WTCs over the years, on both harpsichord and piano,
among them those by Richard Egarr, Glenn Gould, Keith Jarrett, Angela Hewitt,
Craig Sheppard, András Schiff, Ralph Kirkpatrick, Kenneth Gilbert, Bob van
Asperen, Luc Beauséjour, and probably half a dozen others. I think I can
honestly say, though that Rebecca Pechefsky endows these preludes and
fugues with a sense of gladness in being alive that strikes me as quite
extraordinary."
—Jerry Dubins,
Fanfare
For this recording, Rebecca Pechefsky uses the Werckmeister III tuning
throughout, the original “well-tempered” tuning that makes every key usable—
though each retains its distinct character—and a popular temperament in
Bach’s day.