Copyright © 2016 Quill Classics
BROOKLYN
BAROQUE
David
Bakamjian,
cello
Rebecca
Pechefsky,
harpsichord
Brooklyn Baroque debuted in the fall of 2000, when cellist David Bakamjian
joined the long-standing duo of Baroque flutist Andrew Bolotowsky and
harpsichordist Rebecca Pechefsky. The trio performed frequently in the New York
area and was invited to play in other states across the country. In July 2015  
Andrew Bolotowsky announced that he would be leaving the ensemble. Core
members Pechefsky and Bakamjian frequently collaborate with the finest early-
music specialists in the New York area. Brooklyn Baroque specializes in the music
of Bach and his contemporaries, but its concerts often range further back into the
seventeenth century or as far forward as Beethoven. The ensemble’s debut CD,
Northern Lights (QC 1005), a program of German Baroque works, was followed by
The Pleasures of the French (QC 1007), Bach: Works for Flute (QC 1008), and
Boismortier Sonatas for Cello (QC 1010). Guest artists have included recorder
player Gregory Bynum; oboist Priscilla Herreid; violinists Tatiana Daubek, Rachel
Evans, Judson Griffin, Robert Mealy, Heidi Powell, Lisa Rautenberg, Theresa
Salomon, Vita Wallace, Beth Wenstrom, and Margaret Ziemnicka; cellist Christine
Gummere; cellist and viola da gambist Carlene Stober; sopranos Sofia Dimitrova,
Jessica Gould, Marguerite Krull, and Amanda Sidebottom; mezzo-sopranos
Melissa Attebury and Kate Maroney; countertenors Jeffrey Dooley and Drew
Minter; tenor Timothy Hodges; and bass-baritone Jonathan Woody. Reviewing
Brooklyn Baroque’s
Northern Lights for the American Record Guide, Christopher
Chaffee wrote: “I cannot stop listening to this recital of northern European
chamber music. Everything about this disc is commendable . . . The playing is
fantastic—sensitive, well shaped, and engaging.”  Jen-yen Chen, reviewing the
disc for
Early  Music America, noted: “Flutist Andrew Bolotowsky earns high marks
for his lively, supple, and clear-toned musicality, as does the trio as a whole for its
unified ensemble playing and its energetic engagement.” In his
American Record
Guide
review of The Pleasures of the French, Chaffee  commented: “You can
hear the passion, intensity, and joy, but the class and sublime attention to detail
never escapes.” And James A. Altena, writing for
Fanfare, called Brooklyn
Baroque’s recording
Bach: Works for Flute “nothing short of revelatory.” Brooklyn
Baroque has long been the ensemble-in-residence at the historic Morris-Jumel
Mansion, the oldest surviving house in Manhattan.
QC Video
Allegro (Vivaldi)
Sonata a due, RV 86 (Vivaldi)
Schweig, aufgetürmtes Meer (Bach)
Règne, Amour (Boismortier)
Allegro ma non presto (Bach)
Concerto for Harpsichord with
Flute (Corrette)
Ich habe genug (Bach)
Tristes captifs (Campra)
Jesu, meine Freude (Krebs)
Schlage bald (Krebs)
Begli occhi (Strozzi)
An Evening Hymn (Purcell)
Gayement (Boismortier)
Allemanda* (Boismortier)
Largo* (Boismortier)
Sonata No. 1 (Cervetto):
I.
Adagio* II. Allegro*  III. Minuetto*

*Not HD
Brooklyn Baroque & Friends: Theresa Salomon, Tatiana Daubek, Jonathan Woody,
Rebecca Pechefsky, Kristina Giles, David Bakamjian, and Priscilla Herreid